How to Pickle Jalapenos for Delicious Snacks All Year Long

How to Pickle Jalapenos

How to Pickle Jalapenos? Do you have a glut of fresh jalapenos in your garden this year? Me too! With canning season just around the corner, I wanted to share one of my favorite canning recipes as well as how to pickle jalapenos for the winter.

I started my garden the first year we lived in this property. I was impatient, so I began growing a few spicy peppers indoors in January. I had absolutely no notion what I was doing.

I was disappointed when numerous people informed me that my hot peppers wouldn’t stand a chance in our short growing season.

How to Pickle Jalapenos
How to Pickle Jalapenos

It’s a good thing I never listen to people since those peppers produced like crazy that first year.

I currently have 48 pepper plants in my “small” garden.

Before you think I’m insane, let me tell you that we consume a lot of peppers in this family. How to Pickle Jalapenos ? 40 of these pepper plants are red bell pepper kinds, and the remainder are all jalapenos.

We discovered how to pickle jalapenos a few years ago and haven’t stopped since. I pickle enough firecrackers to last my family the entire winter! They’re on practically everything.

I’M MAKING MY OWN JALAPENOS

I had no idea what I know now about growing peppers—I just got lucky. I started the pepper plants indoors in January, lopped off their heads in March, and planted them outside in mid-June. The remainder was done by the sun and heat.

However, starting the spicy peppers so early is critical. They require time to grow and a long season to ripen.

With my 100-day growth season, I don’t have any of those options.

Cutting off their heads was a fortunate rookie error. I removed the heads since they were becoming tall and lanky due to a lack of enough illumination. It was a mistake that turned out to be quite useful. Cutting off the top node of the pepper plant develops the second node, and the plant produces more than it would if allowed to grow alone.

This procedure is the subject of much controversy on the internet. How to Pickle Jalapenos I can only speak candidly about my recent experiences. The yields were MUCH higher in years when I trimmed the tops of pepper plants than in years when I did not.

So I must say, “Off with their heads!”

This year’s jalapeno plants produced so much that I had to give most of it away. The rest I preserved to eat throughout the winter.

Once you’ve mastered the art of pickling jalapenos, you’ll always have place in your garden for a plant or two.

WHERE CAN YOU GET FRESH JALAPENOS IF YOU CAN’T GROW THEM?

I used to buy jalapeno plants at my local grocery store or farmer’s market before I started growing them myself. I was taken aback by the cost of a few jalapenos at the grocery shop. Four peppers cost around $5.00 where I reside.

What do you mean? No way! Not in this lifetime!

Granted, I live in Northern Canada, where jalapenos do not grow by the side of the road. They may require some care to grow here, but a buck for a pepper seems a little ridiculous.

I cultivated my jalapeno peppers from seed in my own garden, so my expenditure was pennies. How to Pickle Jalapenos Even if I purchased the plants from a greenhouse, they are still far less expensive than purchasing the peppers from the grocery store.

Buying and pickling jalapenos is not a cost-effective option where I live. If you have the opportunity, I highly recommend growing them.

How to harvest jalapenos from the plant: Jalapenos are ready to harvest when they are brilliant green, firm, and glossy.

THIS CANNING SEASON, LEARN HOW TO PICKLE JALAPENOS

It is really simple to learn how to pickle jalapenos. It’s not difficult, and it doesn’t need much time or specific ingredients.

I don’t season my pickled jalapenos with anything. How to Pickle Jalapenos There was no garlic, oregano, or anything else. I’m looking for a simple pickled pepper that tastes like jalapenos.

But, if you want garlic and oregano, I say go ahead and prepare them how you want them.

I don’t like peppers with a lot of flavoring added to them, and I prefer my jalapenos to taste like jalapenos, but that’s just me. I use basic brine, and they taste great after a few months in the refrigerator.

In the step-by-step directions below, I’ve documented my technique as well as a few tips and tricks. I’ve even included a downloadable recipe card at the bottom of this page just for you!

STEP 1: PREPARATION AND STERILIZATION OF YOUR JARS

It’s critical to clean and disinfect your jars before using them, especially if you’re storing these peppers for the winter.

Pickle rings are best stored in 1/2 pint jars. How to Pickle Jalapenos They are ideal for a meal or two, or to add a couple to a sandwich. I don’t have to be concerned about a larger container going to waste if we don’t finish it in time.

Of course, you can store them in larger jars if you choose. The processing time for quarts is slightly longer than for pints and half pints, but this has no effect on the outcome.

STEP 2: WASH AND CUT THE JALAPENOS

Make sure to thoroughly clean the jalapenos before beginning to work with them. Allow them to dry and come to room temperature on the counter.

DO NOT USE COLD PEPPERS FROM THE Fridge TO PROCESS. When you add the brine, your peppers should be at room temperature.

STEP 3: MAKE THE BRINE

  • Bring 2 cups of water, 6 cups of vinegar, and 1/2 cup coarse pickling salt to a boil in a large pot.
  • When your brine reaches a rolling boil, fill your jars to 1/4 inch from the top.
  • To remove any bubbles, probe about the jars with a knife.
  • Wipe the rims clean with a clean cloth or paper towel, then add the lids and rings and twist just finger tight.
  • Avoid overtightening your caps.
  • Fill your canner halfway with jars and process for 10 minutes for 1/2 pints and pints, and 15 minutes for quarts.

STEP 4: RETAIN YOUR JARS

Remove the jars from the canner and set them aside for 24 hours to cool.

Examine your seals. If any did not properly seal, place them in the refrigerator and consume within a month. For the jars that did seal, your jalapenos will keep for a year if kept in a cool place.

It’s a waiting game, similar to making homemade pickles. You’ll have to wait two months for your pickled hot peppers to be ready to consume.

That’s how you pickle jalapeno peppers – I told you it was simple!

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Hello there! Cuisine Cravings Team is a group of people who are passionate about Kitchen Ideas that developed this website to educate people on the finest kitchen techniques. We publish articles that focus on basic and fundamental cooking ideas for all levels of chefs, from beginners to specialists! Our objective is to remove the guesswork out of meal preparation so you may worry less and enjoy more! Food is an important aspect of our life, and we are excited to share our knowledge with you!

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